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Antarctic meteorites - microscopic view - different types

This digitalisation was realised by the team “Virtual Microscope” of The Open University, UK. https://virtualmicroscope.org BELAM (Belgian Antarctic Meteorites): since 2009, through a joint collaboration with the National Institute of Polar Research (NIRP) in Japan, Belgian scientists have carried out meteorite searches in the Sør Rondane region of Antarctica near the Belgian station Princess Elisabeth. The 2009-2010, 2010-2011 and 2012-2013 field seasons have yielded more than 1200 new meteorites, that are shared equally between the two countries. Stony meteorites can in general be divided into undifferentiated (chondrites) and differentiated meteorites (achondrites), which are further subdivided into classes, clans and groups. Chondrites are the most abundant meteorite group and constitute the most primitive solar system material. They formed around 4.56 billion years ago as part of the formation of their parent bodies and as such, they contain important information of the early solar system formation (e.g. physical-chemical properties of the protoplanetary disk region(s)). Most chondrites are characterized by the presence of abundant chondrules, which are mm-sized spheres consisting mainly of the silicate minerals olivine and pyroxene. Chondrite are further divided into three main classes: carbonaceous chondrites, ordinary chondrites and enstatite chondrites. Carbonaceous chondrites are of great interest because some contain up to 5% carbon in a variety of forms, including organic matter, carbonates, and minor amounts of “exotic” presolar grain material such as diamond or graphite. Achondrites are igneous rocks or breccias of rock fragments from differentiated planetary bodies (i.e. planetary bodies with a core and crust), such as Mars, the Moon or asteroids. Contrary to most chondrites, achondrites do not have any chondrules. They can further be subdivided into primitive achondrites and achondrites.

 

  

A09135 

      
   

 

MICROSCOPE

 

INFORMATION

  
   

CHONDRITES Type LL3

     

 

  

A09474 

      
   

 

MICROSCOPE

 

INFORMATION

  
   

CHONDRITES Type CM2

     

 

  

A10198

      
   

 

MICROSCOPE

 

INFORMATION

  
   

CHONDRITES Type CO

     

 

  

A10222

      
   

 

MICROSCOPE

 

INFORMATION

  
   

CHONDRITES Type CK4

     
    

A09317

      
   

 

MICROSCOPE

 

INFORMATION

  
   

ACHONDRITES Type Ureilite

     
    

A09545

      
   

 

MICROSCOPE

 

INFORMATION

  
   

ACHONDRITES Type Mes

     
    

A12144

      
   

 

MICROSCOPE

 

INFORMATION

  
   

ACHONDRITES Type Diogenite

     
    

A12223

      
   

 

MICROSCOPE

 

INFORMATION

  
   

ACHONDRITES Type Eucrite

     
 
 
 
 
 
Marleen De Ceukelaire 
(collection conservator)
+32 (0)2 788 76 37
  marleen.deceukelaire@naturalsciences.be